Intel Debuts New Scalable Processors

What An IT Salesperson Actually Does

It’s about that time again when everyone is talking cores, threads, and gigahertz.  Intel is starting to roll out their newest line of Xeon processors, which are being referred to as “scalable processors” powered by the new Skylake-SP core.

The existing architecture had limitations around the number of cores and threads that Intel has been trying to solve for several years.  Rather than simply adding iterative improvements to existing processors, this latest processor family from Intel has been re-architected from the ground up to improve performance, efficiency, and security.

Outside of changes to the architecture, Intel has also moved away from the E# naming convention in favor of a metal-based tiers: Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum. Whether this new convention adds clarity or complexity is yet to be seen. I know what you’re thinking: “I have to learn a whole new naming convention all over again?!” But have no fear! Here is a quick breakdown of the new tiers, as well as a cheat sheet for deciphering full model numbers under the new system:

  • Platinum (8100 series)
    • Use Cases: Mission-critical applications such Enterprise resource planning (ERP), In-memory Analytics, Online Analytical Processing (OLAP), High-Frequency Trading (HFT), Machine Learning, Virtualization, Containers.
    • CPU Cores: Up to 28
    • Socket Configurations: 8+
    • Memory: Up to 12TB
  • Gold (6100/5100 series)
    • Use Cases: OLTP, Analytics, Machine Learning, Hadoop/SPARK workloads, server-side Java, Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI), High-Performance Computing (HPC), Virtualization, Containers.
    • CPU Cores: Up to 22
    • Socket Configurations: Up to 4
    • Memory: Up to 6TB
  • Silver (4100 series)
    • Use Cases: SMB workloads, Web front end, network & storage applications for organizations who are anticipating growth.
    • CPU Cores: Up to 12
    • Socket Configurations: Up to 2
    • Memory: Up to 1.5TB
  • Bronze (3100 series)
    • Use Cases: SMB workloads and basic storage servers.
    • CPU Cores: Up to 12
    • Socket Configurations: Up to 2
    • Memory: Up to 1.5TB

Unlike the ring architecture used on previous processors, Intel has developed a new mesh interconnect architecture which allows a shorter path for data to travel by increasing the number of pathways.  Intel states that the new processors are 1.65 times faster than its previous generation.  Another big improvement for performance and efficiency in the new Intel Xeon processors is the increase in the number of supported PCIe 3.0 lanes to a whopping 48 PCIe 3.0 lanes per processor!

Security has been a focus of this release.  Key Protection Technology, which makes it more difficult to retrieve encryption keys by keeping the operations for encrypting and decrypting directly on the processor rather than offloading them to memory, is another great feature of this latest technology. For a complete overview of the new system, Intel has created a comprehensive guide you can find here. We look forward to seeing these advances in tech in action!

The Great WiFi Migration

Cloud this, virtual that… it’s the future, and mostly it’s a good thing! Welcome to the great WiFi expansion, folks!

The Past

Not too long ago, when people started deploying multiple wireless access points (APs) in a single location, they realized how cumbersome it was to manage all APs individually. The masses demanded a way of managing multiple APs from a single location, and so the Controller was born. A Controller is just what the name says: a device that ‘controls’ and manages all APs from one central location.

For some time, this was the only option for managing multiple APs, and there was no way around it. And it was a great thing. It still is.

Now 

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BYOD: Is it Worth the Risk?

The Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) phenomenon has become a highly debated topic in many organizations. While some enterprises are fully enveloped in the BYOD trend, others are hesitant to adopt this new strategy because of the numerous risks associated with it. Regardless, here is what you need to know to be BYOD-ready.

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Jibba Jabba or the Nines Nines Nines

You’ve probably heard “nines” thrown around when talking high availability, so let’s review them to make everyone talk the same talk or IT Jibba-Jabba.

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DDoS Ammunition: Are you protected?

Saar here, resident engineer at Myriad Supply. Today I’ll be discussing DDoS ammunition.

The FFIEC gives “recommendations” to banking institutions.  This is a non-binding recommendation, and there is no law per say that says you must have DDoS protection.  However, if someone suffers financial damages due to a DDoS attack on a bank, that person can hire an attorney who can then prove that the bank handled itself without due diligence in spite of government recommendations. So a reasonable judge will find the bank at fault and it would have to pay.  Add a class action, and you’re looking at a pretty hefty sum. In this article for example, http://www.scmagazine.com/banks-file-class-action-against-target-and-trustwave-over-massive-breach/article/339760/, the banks are suing Target for failing to have decent security, which cost them millions replacing stolen payment cards.

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Breaking news: Ruckus Will Be Joining The Cloud!

That’s right people, the Controller based wireless giant is working on a cloud offering similar to Aerohive, Aruba and Meraki.

For now, it is still too early to tell what we are exactly in for. Ruckus is keeping their cards close.  As a matter of fact, the whole Ruckus Cloud offering subject is very hush hush.   Just getting whispers on the subject wasn’t easy – we had to have our cousin Vinny pay a visit to Ruckus HQ with a baseball bat.

For plausible deniability, we cannot tell you what he did there. For now, we know that Ruckus will be making a public announcement of their Cloud Managed solution some time in April. We are not sure if the solution will be ready by then, or if that’s when it will be announced. What we do know, however, is that this will be a huge win for Ruckus.

Cloud managed solutions are somewhat new, and up until recently Aerohive and Meraki were the only two giants in the field. Since then, Aruba has introduced their Aruba Central Cloud management service. Meraki was purchased by Cisco in Q4 of 2012 – therefore Cisco has a cloud managed WiFi. And now, Ruckus is joining the pack!

What’s all the fuss about Cloud managed WiFi and why the move toward them, you might ask? Well, the short answer is: Cloud managed WiFi solutions offer the benefits of a physical controller, without the huge initial cost.
I will not be going over what those benefits are, as I have already done this in another blog, so if you would like to find out more on Cloud vs. Controller based WiFi solutions click here.

Ruckus Cloud Managed WiFi is huge news, and we will keep our ears open for any new information. Or maybe we will send cousin Vinny to visit Ruckus HQ again.

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Peter Yordanov. Signing Out.