Intel Debuts New Scalable Processors

What An IT Salesperson Actually Does

It’s about that time again when everyone is talking cores, threads, and gigahertz.  Intel is starting to roll out their newest line of Xeon processors, which are being referred to as “scalable processors” powered by the new Skylake-SP core.

The existing architecture had limitations around the number of cores and threads that Intel has been trying to solve for several years.  Rather than simply adding iterative improvements to existing processors, this latest processor family from Intel has been re-architected from the ground up to improve performance, efficiency, and security.

Outside of changes to the architecture, Intel has also moved away from the E# naming convention in favor of a metal-based tiers: Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum. Whether this new convention adds clarity or complexity is yet to be seen. I know what you’re thinking: “I have to learn a whole new naming convention all over again?!” But have no fear! Here is a quick breakdown of the new tiers, as well as a cheat sheet for deciphering full model numbers under the new system:

  • Platinum (8100 series)
    • Use Cases: Mission-critical applications such Enterprise resource planning (ERP), In-memory Analytics, Online Analytical Processing (OLAP), High-Frequency Trading (HFT), Machine Learning, Virtualization, Containers.
    • CPU Cores: Up to 28
    • Socket Configurations: 8+
    • Memory: Up to 12TB
  • Gold (6100/5100 series)
    • Use Cases: OLTP, Analytics, Machine Learning, Hadoop/SPARK workloads, server-side Java, Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI), High-Performance Computing (HPC), Virtualization, Containers.
    • CPU Cores: Up to 22
    • Socket Configurations: Up to 4
    • Memory: Up to 6TB
  • Silver (4100 series)
    • Use Cases: SMB workloads, Web front end, network & storage applications for organizations who are anticipating growth.
    • CPU Cores: Up to 12
    • Socket Configurations: Up to 2
    • Memory: Up to 1.5TB
  • Bronze (3100 series)
    • Use Cases: SMB workloads and basic storage servers.
    • CPU Cores: Up to 12
    • Socket Configurations: Up to 2
    • Memory: Up to 1.5TB

Unlike the ring architecture used on previous processors, Intel has developed a new mesh interconnect architecture which allows a shorter path for data to travel by increasing the number of pathways.  Intel states that the new processors are 1.65 times faster than its previous generation.  Another big improvement for performance and efficiency in the new Intel Xeon processors is the increase in the number of supported PCIe 3.0 lanes to a whopping 48 PCIe 3.0 lanes per processor!

Security has been a focus of this release.  Key Protection Technology, which makes it more difficult to retrieve encryption keys by keeping the operations for encrypting and decrypting directly on the processor rather than offloading them to memory, is another great feature of this latest technology. For a complete overview of the new system, Intel has created a comprehensive guide you can find here. We look forward to seeing these advances in tech in action!

How Do You Protect Your Business When the Threat Landscape Is Always Evolving?

Security Ransomware

Staying ahead of the curve when it comes to security attacks can be a challenge many find to be nearly impossible to achieve. But why is it so difficult? Every day, attacks targeting juggernauts of industry are featured in breaking news. An example is the recent “Wannacry” ransomware attack, which affected thousands of computers all over the world—from Europe to Asia to North America, locking users out of their computers and demanding ransoms. What’s concerning about these attacks is not only the frequency of them, but how they quickly inspire imitators.  

New attacks using combinations of execution code to bypass defense systems are popping up. Even more concerning, ransomware/botnet attacks are now hijacking ICS to re-route ambulances causing life-threatening consequences. And the hard truth is this won’t stop; new malware will be written with multiple code execution paths that are designed to set off benign processes while under scan and then execute malicious code once your anti-virus deems it to be safe. 

You might be indignantly thinking why? My anti-virus is supposed to stop all threats—my vendor said so! Why is it so difficult to defend my organization? 

The short answer is that it doesn’t have to be. Having implemented and reverse engineered many security solutions, I can say honestly that you cannot adopt or rely upon a single strategy or single solution to defend your posture. It takes a holistic and tiered approach to be able to defend and take on attacks from different vectors. 

A long time ago, I was once on the offensive side acting out DDoS attacks while playing a game called “Counter-Strike.” Why is this relevant? It seems hard to believe, but this game helped me adopt a philosophy on cybersecurity that I will never forget and will use for the rest of my career. I hope you can take this philosophy to heart, and that it will also help you protect your business as well as yourself from being hacked. 

Know your risk. 

Designing a secure infrastructure starts with knowing your greatest risks and weaknesses. Think like a hacker. What is the most critical asset? What type of attacks are you vulnerable to? What would someone do to exploit it that risk? Knowing is the first step. 

Identify your risk. 

In the following tiers: Reputation, Operational, and Intellectual Property. Once you’ve identified your risk in these arenas, plan a defensive strategy accordingly.  

Defend. 

Your strategy should lead to you knowing your network better than anyone else. You are the first and last line of defense. Security solutions are simply technology, but without configuring that technology to its strictest potential, you will not win. Do not allow any attacker to exploit your posture. Conduct vulnerability assessments and risk audits. Conducting threat assessments regularly is a critical step in continually developing your security plan.

Myriad & Girl Develop It March Campaign Kicks Off today!

Just a reminder that the March 2015 Myriad & Girl Develop It Campaign kicks off today! Join us on Twitter to help raise money for GDI and enter to win a Dell XPS 13 Ultrabook!

Here’s how it’s going to work:

  • We’ll post a question to Twitter each day starting today relating to women in tech
  • For every correct answer using our hashtag #MyriadGives, we’ll donate $1 to GDI*
  • We’ll also donate $1 to GDI for every retweet (RT) of our question*
  • Every time anyone answers correctly and/or retweets our question we’ll enter them into a drawing at the end of the month for a new Dell XPS 13 Ultrabook!
  • Each day, tweets and replies are due at 11:59 EST.
  • Contest ends at 11:59pm EST on 3/30/15. Winner will be announced via Twitter (@MyriadSupply) at 12pm EST 3/31/15.

Questions? Email us at giving@myriadsupply.com. Good luck & thanks for helping us raise money & awareness for GDI!

 

*Myriad will donate up to $10,000 total. Each Twitter handle may reply to one tweet and Retweet once per day.

BYOD: Is it Worth the Risk?

The Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) phenomenon has become a highly debated topic in many organizations. While some enterprises are fully enveloped in the BYOD trend, others are hesitant to adopt this new strategy because of the numerous risks associated with it. Regardless, here is what you need to know to be BYOD-ready.

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2038 – The End of Time (UNIX)


The set date for when time will end is January 19th, 2038 at precisely 03:14:07 UTC. It is not a hoax or made up aluminum-foil-hat-wearing-hippy stuff. This is real, and it will happen. Nothing we can do about it so you better start getting ready for it sooner than later.

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